Forest & Bird Bat Project wins Enviro Award

05 Apr 2013

The hard work of over 60 volunteers was publicly acknowledged when Te Hoiere Bat Recovery Project at Pelorus Bridge Scenic Reserve was declared a category winner at the Marlborough Environmental Awards last month.

Caption: (front) volunteer co-ordinator Jenny Easton, bat scientist Brian Lloyd, Top of the South Field Officer Debs Martin, Morgan Road Nursery representative Tracey Verry, (back) Nelson-Tasman’s Julie McLintock, Marlborough branch chairman Andrew John, DOC volunteer Siobain Browning

Caption: (front) volunteer co-ordinator Jenny Easton, bat scientist Brian Lloyd, Top of the South Field Officer Debs Martin, Morgan Road Nursery representative Tracey Verry, (back) Nelson-Tasman’s Julie McLintock, Marlborough branch chairman Andrew John, DOC volunteer Siobain Browning

Forest & Bird’s Debs Martin was “overwhelmed” when the Forest & Bird bat project was announced the winner of the award’s Landscape and Habitat Enhancement section, especially given the high calibre of entrants.

“The whole thing about this project is it is dealing with the sharp end of an important conservation issue, it’s utilising the community really well and building a good relationship with iwi, council and DOC. And it’s not only about the bats, it helps restore the forest and protect birds in the area,” she says.

The project received $500 for its category win, and $500 to spend at Morgans Road Nursery. The voucher will be used to buy eco-sourced seedlings to regenerate native bush in the nearby Ronga Scenic Reserve where the long-tailed bats frequent.

Forest & Bird’s bat project is a combined effort of Forest & Bird members from Nelson-Tasman and Marlborough and community volunteers. Volunteers clock up 80 hours a month checking 500 traps across 150ha to catch rats, stoats, possums and feral cats that threaten the livelihood of the local long-tailed bat population.